Rios’ Escape to a Better Life

Marlon Rios left his war-driven country for a better life for himself and helping others.

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Rios’ Escape to a Better Life

Marlon Rios, Systems Analyst, checks his emails in the morning making sure he knows what he is doing for the day. Every morning he strives to make sure he meets with everyone's problems.

Marlon Rios, Systems Analyst, checks his emails in the morning making sure he knows what he is doing for the day. Every morning he strives to make sure he meets with everyone's problems.

Photo by Angelo Silva

Marlon Rios, Systems Analyst, checks his emails in the morning making sure he knows what he is doing for the day. Every morning he strives to make sure he meets with everyone's problems.

Photo by Angelo Silva

Photo by Angelo Silva

Marlon Rios, Systems Analyst, checks his emails in the morning making sure he knows what he is doing for the day. Every morning he strives to make sure he meets with everyone's problems.

Ben Anderson and Angelo Silva

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When Marlon Rios, Systems Analyst, walks into the room, students and teachers alike are contented for his help and his constant positive attitude. Rios is in charge of all the student’s Chromebooks, repairing projectors, fixing teacher’s computers, among with many other responsibilities. 

Rios’ story starts in Nicaragua. His country was in turmoil, and he came to the United States at 16 years old in 1983.

“My mother sent me to the United States because my country was at war, and they were recruiting young kids like me so we could be in the Army,” said Rios.

His mom sent him to live with his sister who had already been living here. He found it difficult to adjust at first, however he did adjust extraordinarily well. 

“There’s a lot of things you’re not used to over here. The language is different, the customs, the culture is different. The food is different,” said Rios. “All that stuff made it a little bit difficult to adjust. But when you’re a kid, you just roll with the punches like they say. And you get used to living in the United States.” 

After graduating high school, Rios found an interest in IT, and working in education. He’s always valued education as a centerpiece to his morals and values. He attended Wichita State to pursue Computer Science as an undergraduate.

“I’m big on education. I feel like if you don’t get an education you won’t get that far.” Rios said.

Rios is a major asset to all of Maize South, and they have welcomed him over the years with open arms. Business teacher Samantha Cooper knows the true value of Rios’ to all classrooms within MSHS.

“Without him, this classroom wouldn’t run.” Mrs. Cooper, business teacher said. “He’s so friendly, loving, and he always has a smile on his face. He’s a great addition to our school.”

Rios’ feelings for his coworkers is mutual, as he appreciates his job as much as anyone.

“Maize South is one of the best places to work. The people are very easy going,” said Rios about his work environment. “I feel like they treat me like family.”

As per his specific IT responsibilities, Rios spends a majority of his time fixing things and programming computers. All of his IT decisions are based with the best intentions for our student body.

“I just like doing my part. My intention is to do the best that I can.” Rios said. “I’m trying to do the right things for the kids and make sure they have what they need to get their education.”

Rios enjoys the work itself as well, from programming to repairing. And while it is a job, and it is work, he feels it is a hobby that brings in a paycheck.

“IT is something I like to do. Playing with computers, writing programs, it was a very easy decision for working IT,” said Rios. “I feel like I’m just playing all day but at the same time I’m helping people, so I fit right in.”