Roller coasters move physics from theory to real life

Hayden+Woods%2C+Eric+Dinkel+and+Tyler+Bauer%2C+all+12%2C+made+a+roller+coaster+constructed+of+primarily+a+toilet+lid%2C+seat+and+stuff+bought+a+Lowes.++It+took+them+three+days+to+make+their+toilet+themed+roller+coaster.++Photo+by+C.+Kasitz

Hayden Woods, Eric Dinkel and Tyler Bauer, all 12, made a roller coaster constructed of primarily a toilet lid, seat and stuff bought a Lowes. It took them three days to make their toilet themed roller coaster. Photo by C. Kasitz

by Collin Kasitz

Mikel Tinich’s physics class designed and made their own roller coasters to demonstrate how to advance physics from just a theory to real life.  It was due Nov. 30 and they presented their coasters that same day. 

“We went to Lowes to buy a bunch of random stuff that was related to the toilet theme for the roller coaster, Eric Dinkel, 12, said.  “We designed it with different styles of rollercoasters until one worked.” 

It was a group project and each group designed their coaster with an original theme.  The project was worth 100 points, equivalent to four lab grades. 

“We worked on the rollercoaster for three days from 4-9 p.m. each day,” Dinkel said.

There were teachers that judged the projects and the group with the lowest score overall won.  The group that won was Hayden Woods, Eric Dinkel and Tyler Bauer, all 12.

 

Hayden Woods, Eric Dinkel and Tyler Bauer, all 12, made a roller coaster constructed of primarily a toilet lid, seat and stuff bought a Lowes. It took them three days to make their toilet themed roller coaster. Photo by C. Kasitz