Spanish, art classes celebrate Day of the Dead

Rebekka Hepford, 12, presents her project of someone who has died in the past who she loved for her The Day of the Dead project. Everyone listens as they sit in Spanish 3, Rachel Delzer’s class. Photo by J. Nave

Rebekka Hepford, 12, presents her project of someone who has died in the past who she loved for her The Day of the Dead project. Everyone listens as they sit in Spanish 3, Rachel Delzer’s class. Photo by J. Nave

by Jarret Nave

The Day of the Dead started on Oct. 31 and went until Nov. 2. The Day of the Dead (or El Día de los Muertos in Spanish) is a Catholic holiday celebrated mostly in Mexico and throughout other cultures to honor loved ones who died.

Spanish classes and Spanish Club honored this by celebrating. Rachel Delzer’s classes made ofrendas (offerings) with people who had died. Adam Silva, 10, from Delzer’s class made an Ofrenda for Apple icon, Steve Jobs.

“I would have gotten sad if I would have done someone in my family or someone close to me,” Silva said.

Amy Dick, Spanish, had fiestas (parties) with her classes, and everyone brough something to share.

“We celebrated by eating food that we brought, but we all had to wait in line for the food,” Ty Zorn, 10, said.

 Dan Gegen’s classes made skulls to celebrate the holiday, which symbolize resurrection for the culture.

“It was fun to make the skulls, but it was a little bit difficult,” Tristan Dunbarr, 12, said. “I decided to do a dragon skull instead of a human skull to celebrate.”

Adam Silvia, 10, presents his Day of the Dead project as everyone listens. He did Steve Jobs and decorated his box well like everyone else. Photo by J. Nave
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Rebekka Hepford, 12, presents her project of someone who has died in the past who she loved for her The Day of the Dead project. Everyone listens as they sit in Spanish 3, Rachel Delzer’s class. Photo by J. Nave