Sports injuries multiply, stall athletes

Football+players+from+left+Britton+Farney%2C+11%2C+Alex+McGuire%2C+10%2C+David+Northrup%2C+12%2C+Danny+Minks%2C+12%2C+Dylan+Amspacker%2C+12%2C+and+Jacob+Lankutis%2C+10%2C+sit+on+the+bench+during+the+Sept.+30+homecoming+game.+Taking+up+the+whole+bench+these+team+members+were+unable+to+play+due+to+their+various+injuries.+Photo+by+A.+Esser

Football players from left Britton Farney, 11, Alex McGuire, 10, David Northrup, 12, Danny Minks, 12, Dylan Amspacker, 12, and Jacob Lankutis, 10, sit on the bench during the Sept. 30 homecoming game. Taking up the whole bench these team members were unable to play due to their various injuries. Photo by A. Esser

by Austyn Esser

Sports injuries have become a bit of an epidemic at South this year. From broken bones and torn ligaments to cringe-worthy concussions, students have felt the painful consequences of slipping up and unfortunate collisions during sporting events.

It may take four quarters to play a football game, but it only takes a split second to snap a bone. Kane McCarthy, 11, knows this all too well as he broke his lower fibula during a practice play.

“I was at football practice and it was during a play and I started to slip on the turf and I tried to stop myself, but then my leg just broke,” McCarthy said.

Not only did McCarthy have to undergo surgery, but he now has to endure the inconvenience of crutches for the next five weeks.

“I was like I need some medicine because it hurt really bad,” McCarthy said. “The surgery was worse than when I actually broke it and being on crutches stinks.

Slipping on the football turf is apparently not uncommon, as senior Danny Minks also had a slippery fall during a practice.

“I was running sprints and I slipped on the turf and jammed my thumb into the ground and fell,” Minks said.

One simple jam was severe enough to tear the ligament in his thumb, which needs casting for an entire six weeks, as well as cost him the end of his senior football season and steal all of his time to get in shape for the swim season. His hand will be freed from the cast and for immediate physical therapy only five days before the swimming season, which begins on Nov. 14.

Visible injuries that are in need of casting and use of crutches may be severe, but those that are not visible to the naked eye take it to the next level.

“I was playing a [soccer] game against Rosehill and the ball was in the air while I was running and a kid just came up full speed and hit me in the face with his shoulder,” Alex Bacon, 11, said. “I didn’t pass out, but I had a black eye and a nose bleed.”

The obvious black eye and bloody nose may have seemed like the worst part of the collision when in fact the invisible underlying problem of a concussion was not as easy of a fix as a pack of ice and a box of tissues. Bacon’s concussion was not realized when the Rosehill trainer originally tested him by asking him his phone number and who his coach was in addition to the balance test since he aced all of these exams. The next day was a different story.

“Concussions are definitely a bad thing,” Bacon said. “When I did the concussion test the next day the trainer said had I gone back in I could have gotten a potentially worse injury and possibly have died.”

Football players from left Britton Farney, 11, Alex McGuire, 10, David Northrup, 12, Danny Minks, 12, Dylan Amspacker, 12, and Jacob Lankutis, 10, sit on the bench during the Sept. 30 homecoming game. Taking up the whole bench these team members were unable to play due to their various injuries. Photo by A. Esser